Tyndrum

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Tyndrum is a village in the Highlands of Scotland, 62 miles northwest of Glasgow, 46 miles southeast of Fort William, 36 miles west of Oban.

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See also a large Click On Map for the area Top Attractions and Mountains.

Tyndrum is on the A82 road that leads into the Scottish Highlands. On the north side of the village, the road splits in two, north to Glencoe and Fort William, and west to Oban.

This makes the village a popular stop with many tourists stopping for lunch or to shop in the Green Welly Stop. The Green Welly Stop, Tyndrum Inn and Real Food Cafe are popular for snacks and meals.

The village also has two small rail stations, one for Glasgow to Fort William, and the other for Glasgow to Oban.

The West Highland Way walking trail also passes through the village, leading to many more visitors. There are three camp sites here with inexpensive Huts/Wig Wams for camping holidays and walkers such as By the Way in the village, Pine Trees in the village, and Strathfillan Wigwams 2 miles east of the village, also next to the West Highland Way.

The Royal Hotel is situated on the south side of the village, normally a coach tour hotel run by Highland Heritage.

The village has a number of Mountains over 3,000ft within a few miles, so is a good base for walkers and hikers, see the map link above for the mountains with photo tours. There is also a popular walk from just south of the village named the Tyndrum Community Woodland.

You can also walk 6 miles north on the West Highland Way to the Bridge of Orchy Hotel, a nice scenic part of the trail through mountains. Regular buses and trains run between Tyndrum and the Bridge of Orchy should you want to only walk one way.

The river running through Tyndrum is often panned for gold, with plans to open a gold mine 2 miles south of the village under way.

You seem to need permission to pan for gold now. The Pine Trees holiday park gives information on Gold Panning excursions on their land. The largest gold nugget found in Scotland in recent times was valued around £10,000.

The village was built up serving as a stop for drovers running cattle down from the highlands from as early as the 1300s, with the 1700s being the busiest period. The drovers stopped operating after steamships and the railways reached the highlands in the late 1800s.

Mining at Tyndrum began in the 1400s for silver for King James I. Lead mining began at Tyndrum in the 1740s, also producing some silver and gold. The lead mines closed in the 1920s. You can see the old mining cottages across from the Green Welly Stop.

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