114

<< . >>

NAME

RMS. BRITANNIC III

CLASS

LINER

LAUNCHED

AUGUST 6th 1929

BUILT

HARLAND & WOLFF / BELFAST / IRELAND

WEIGHT

26,943 TONS

LENGTH

712 FEET

WIDTH

82 FEET

SPEED

18 KNOTS - DIESEL ENGINES - TWO PROPELLERS


At a time when the French Line and Cunard were building their liners Normandie and Queen Mary, the White Star Line designed a 1,000-foot liner of their own with the intended name being Oceanic. The depression of the 1920s led to the order for Oceanic being cancelled in 1928. With much of the steel for building that ship being on site, the White Star Line decided to use the materials to build a mid sized liner powered by diesel engines. The intended name of Oceanic was changed to Britannic before she set out on her maiden voyage from Liverpool - Belfast, Glasgow and New York June 28th 1930. That voyage saw Britannic become the first diesel powered British liner to be operated on the Atlantic run. Financial difficulties caused by the depression forced the merger of the Cunard and White Star lines in 1934.

Britannic

By 1936, Britannic and her sister ship Georgic were the only two White Star ships still operating in the Cunard/White Star fleet. The British Admiralty requisitioned Britannic to serve as a troopship during World War Two. After undergoing a conversion that gave her the capacity to carry over 5,000 servicemen at a time, she served throughout the war mainly operating between Britain and the Far East and America and North Africa. She was returned to the Cunard/White Star Line in March 1947 after completing the repatriation of servicemen to the Far East. Following an extensive refit, the Cunard/White Star Line began operating Britannic between the Liverpool - New York run and cruises out of New York - Caribbean. Her worn out diesel engines began needing regular repairs from the late 1950s. As the cost of repairs continued to increase over the following years, Britannic was sold to T. W. Ward of Inverkeithing/Scotland for scrapping December 2nd 1960.

Britannic from the air

<< . >>