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NAME

RMS. MEGANTIC

CLASS

LINER

LAUNCHED

DECEMBER 10th 1908

BUILT

HARLAND & WOLFF / BELFAST / IRELAND

WEIGHT

14,878 TONS

LENGTH

565 FEET

WIDTH

67 FEET

SPEED

16.5 KNOTS - PISTON ENGINES - TWO PROPELLERS


Megantic and her sister ship Laurentic were being built side by side for the Dominion Line with their intended names being Alberta and Albany. Both ships were bought by the Dominion Line’s sister company the White Star Line as they were nearing completion. Megantic set out on her maiden voyage from Liverpool - Quebec and Montreal June 17th 1909. With the two ships being operated on the same route between Liverpool and Montreal, the White Star Line compared the performance of their propulsion systems to determine what would be the most suitable for their new Olympic class ships. Although Laurentic’s turbine proved to be a success, the White Star Line eventually decided to use the system of one turbine and two piston engines to power their new large liners. Throughout the four years of World War One, Megantic was mainly used by the British Admiralty to transport troops from Canada and America to the war in Europe.

Megantic

The end of the war saw her returned to the White Star Line to be operated on the Liverpool - New York run. After a few months operating on that route, the White Star Line had Megantic undergo a refit before re-deploying her on the Liverpool - Canada route. That passenger service was interrupted to carry British Government officials to Australia in 1920, and again to transport British troops to China in 1927. After returning from China, she was operated on the London - Halifax and New York route for a short time before being returned to the Liverpool - Montreal run in 1930. Megantic’s failure to run at a profit from a combination of economy cruises and the Canada run at that time led to her being taken out of service in July 1931. After being laid up at Rothesy on the west coast of Scotland for 18 months, she set out for the ship breakers at Osaka/Japan in February 1933.

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